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We Must 'Unite to End TB'- IOM

IOM - News - 7 ore 34 min fa
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Switzerland - On World TB Day 2017, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) joins the Stop TB Partnership, the World Health Organization (WHO) and other key partners in redoubling efforts to increase public awareness of tuberculosis and its impact on vulnerable populations such as migrants.

Although tuberculosis is a curable disease, according to the WHO’s Global TB Report 2016, it remains the world’s leading infectious killer disease, with more deaths every year than HIV/AIDS or malaria. Moreover, it leads to stigmatization and discrimination practices in many countries, further reducing opportunities for key populations, including migrants, to access care and prevention services.

The UN General Assembly in September 2016 saw world leaders agreeing on the development of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, as well as a Global Compact for Refugees. In this context, the health of all migrants is one of the major concerns that need to be addressed by governments and the international community through the promotion of migrants’ access to health and the respect of their human rights, as well as recognition of the positive contributions made by migrants to sustainable development.

On World TB Day 2017, IOM calls for a more proactive international cooperation and approach to eradicate tuberculosis by 2030, as set by the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

In May 2014, the 67th World Health Assembly (WHA) adopted the new End TB Strategy and targets. This strategy aims to end the global TB epidemic by 2035 by setting specific benchmarks and targets. It builds on a “know your epidemic” approach and focuses particularly on serving the most vulnerable and marginalized populations.

To further address and pursue the elimination of tuberculosis, WHO and IOM have developed recommendations on adaptation of the End TB Strategy to specifically address the needs of migrants and mobile populations.

Every day, IOM Missions around the world implement dedicated programmes and initiatives to fight TB, support vulnerable populations in their access to health services and advocate governments and other stakeholders for more migrant-inclusive health policies.

The path towards a world without TB will lead to a UN General Assembly High-Level Meeting on TB in 2018.

Together with our partners, we call for international and coordination action on 24 March 2017 and beyond to ensure that we eradicate TB.

We must “Unite to End TB” because TB knows no borders and we must “Leave No One Behind”.

Posted: Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 16:43Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Director General Visits Tripoli as Crisis Worsens for Libyans and Vulnerable Migrants

IOM - News - Mer, 03/22/2017 - 03:56
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Libya - Today (22/03), IOM Director General William Lacy Swing arrived in Tripoli, Libya, to meet with Libyan authorities regarding the complex migration and displacement situation within the country.

“Libya, once a booming economy which many hopeful migrants viewed as a prized destination, is today a country beset by a grave security situation, a collapsing economy and virtually no service provision which is worsening an increasingly complex migration situation,” Ambassador Swing said upon arrival in Tripoli.

“As humanitarians, we can no longer turn our back on the communities affected by the current migration crisis in Libya. This is why IOM is enhancing its support to the most vulnerable people in the country – be they migrants or Libyans.” 

Through his visit, Ambassador Swing aims to raise the profile of the magnitude of the needs of people in Libya, including migrants and Libyans impacted by the conflict and discuss with the Libyan authorities how IOM can strengthen its technical support to these communities within Libya.

Ambassador Swing will meet with the Interior Minister of the Government of National Accord, Alaref Al Khoja and the Chairman of the Presidential Council of the Government of National Accord, Fayes Al Sarraj.

There are different migratory flows moving through and towards Libya, driven by underdevelopment, state fragility, marginalization and security threats in West Africa, East Africa and the Middle East. The migration situation is compounded by political insecurity and conflict in Libya, which is further exacerbating existing vulnerabilities of all affected communities in the country, including Libyans themselves. Fostering a stable environment to bring about a much-needed holistic approach to migration governance is now a priority.  

There are an estimated 303,608 internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Libya, according to IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix. A majority have been displaced from areas in the north-east and north-west of the country, particularly in Sirte and some parts of Benghazi. Displaced Libyans are suffering from a lack of access to essential services, including critical medical assistance, and economy opportunities. IOM works with local government and communities to promote stability and development for IDPs, migrants and local host communities in Libya, as well as to help establish a better system of managing the migration situation on the ground.

Economic prosperity pre-2011, porous borders, and the complex realities of the political and economic situation in Libya and other regional countries have seen Libya hosting various mixed migration flows, consisting of forced migrants, labour migrants, migrants seeking onwards travel to Europe and migrants who are long term residents of the country. It is estimated that between 700,000 to 1 million migrants have remained in Libya despite the insecurity they face.

Ambassador Swing will also meet with migrants at Triq Al Sekka  detention centre, where he will speak to Head of the Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration, Ahmed Issa, about how IOM can continue to support the centre’s migrants through, for example, direct assistance, infrastructure development and voluntary humanitarian return.

Due to the situation in the country, many migrants are turning to IOM to help them get home. Yesterday, IOM helped 160 stranded migrants return home to Cote d'Ivoire from Tripoli. IOM has helped 13,691 migrants get home to safety since 2011.

Increased support to voluntary humanitarian return is essential to improving migration management, and a long-term commitment to forging links between effective reintegration schemes, stability and local development potential in communities of return is of vital importance.

IOM is launching an Action Plan for Libya to work with the Libyan authorities to address the many challenges faced by migrants, IDPs, returnees and the affected Libyan population. The approach is grounded in two key objectives, which are to urgently provide humanitarian assistance and protection to affected populations in Libya and contribute to stability, build capacities and resilience of Libyan authorities, as well as crisis affected populations themselves.

For further information, please contact Leonard Doyle, Tel: +41 79 2857123, Email:  ldoyle@iom.int , Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int, or Christine Petré in IOM Libya, Tel: +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int

Posted: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 10:55Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

70 Musicians from 20 Countries in Geneva Fundraising Concert for Migrants in Greece

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:35
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Switzerland - This Saturday (25/03) the United Nations Orchestra will play a concert at the Victoria Hall in Geneva, Switzerland. All proceeds from ticket sales will be used to facilitate the psychosocial activities carried out by IOM.

Psychosocial support, such as music therapy, will be provided to migrants affected by the Mediterranean migration crisis – particularly women and children.

The United Nations Orchestra was established with the goal of using symphonic music to support humanitarian efforts, by organizing cultural events to raise funds for humanitarian organizations such as IOM. 

With 70 musicians hailing from 20 different countries, the UN Orchestra is emblematic of the diversity of global migration as well as the universality of music. This benefit concert will contribute to IOM’s aim to promote, protect and support the wellbeing of crisis-affected migrant sending and hosting populations.

Every day, hundreds of people fleeing war and instability in their home countries attempt the perilous journey across the Mediterranean Sea. The shores of Greece have thus become a landing point for migrants in Europe.

“We have several unbroken conflicts from West Africa to Asia and none of them show any signs of resolution anytime soon,” said IOM Director General William Lacy Swing. “The needs of the people are going to be enormous and we have to assist them.”

People have long moved in search of safety and better opportunities for their families. Today, however, conflict, economic instability and climate change fallout are driving millions of men, women and children out of their countries and communities under duress.

Over the past decade, the number of refugees, irregular migrants and asylum seekers arriving in Greece by boat has increased significantly, but a big shift in crossings from the sea to the land border has been observed since 2010 owing to large influxes of migrants from Asia and Africa, who view Greece as a gateway to the European Union.

The stressors connected with the reasons for leaving, the dangerous and undignified conditions of travel, faulty reception systems in transit and destination countries, and the stigma migrants are subject to all combine to threaten the emotional wellbeing of migrants.

“We aim to promote, protect and support the wellbeing of crisis affected populations,” continued Ambassador Swing. “The funds raised from this concert will help develop a music therapy pilot project for migrants in Greece.”

Through consultations with music therapy experts, IOM’s music therapy program hopes to assist migrants by reducing stress and providing a healthy outlet for their emotions. The project will be tested in Greece, and then further improved and developed for migrants in other European countries.

Tickets are available online at http://bit.ly/2lqXRQo for 20 - 80 CHF.

For further information, please contact Florence Kim at IOM HQ, Tel: +41791030342, Email: fkim@iom.int  

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:29Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: IOMOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 20,484, Deaths: 525

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:29
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Switzerland - IOM reports that 20,484 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 19 March, with over 80 percent arriving in Italy and the rest in Spain and Greece. This compares with 160,331 through the first 79 days of 2016.

These arrival numbers do not include 3,312 migrants rescued on 19 March and who are being brought to Italy over the next few days, according to updates from Italy’s Ministry of Interior. Those new arrivals would push this year’s Mediterranean arrival numbers to slightly under 20,000 for Italy alone. That puts 2017’s arrival rate to Italy considerably ahead of the 2015’s first three-month total of 10,165, and ahead of the 2016 three-month total of 18,777 (see chart below).

  Arrivals by sea to Italy
January - December 2015/2016
(source: Italian MoI)  

2016

2015

January

5,273

3,528

February

3,828

4,354

March

9,676

2,283

April

9,149

16,056

May

19,925

21,231

June

22,371

22,877

July

23,552

23,210

August

21,294

22,610

September

16,975

15,922

October

27,384

8,916

November

13,962

3,219

December

8,047

9,636

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project reports 525 Mediterranean deaths, short of the 553 reported during the same period in 2016. Migrants from a landing in Lampedusa reported Monday (20/03) that perhaps 10 people went missing but information is still unclear – other witnesses said three went missing. These additional fatalities are not included in today’s figures. IOM Italy on-field staffers are still investigating. This year at least 481 migrants or refugees have drowned or gone missing on the Central Mediterranean route linking North Africa to Italy. Last year at this time, 159 migrants had been lost on this route.

These fatalities data do not include new information from IOM Libya, which is seeking to verify reports of several incidents that have occurred along the Libyan coast since Friday. Christine Petré of IOM Libya reported late Monday that since 19 March, four rescue missions have been conducted off the Libyan west coast, saving a total of 758 migrants.

She said that on 19 March, 215 migrants including 47 women were rescued off Zuwara from two rubber boats, a rescue that brought reports of three dead bodies and victims of burn injuries from spilled fuel. The rescue operation was carried out by the Libyan Coast Guard.

Those Zuwara victims were taken to a reception facility recently established by IOM with Dutch funding. IOM also worked with the Libyan Red Crescent (LRC) to provide food to the rescued migrants. IOM also distributed hygiene kits and winter blankets.

On 19 March, 223 migrants – 57 of them women (two of whom were pregnant) – sailing in two rubber boats were rescued off Tripoli. The migrants are currently at Triq Al Sekka detention centre. Seventeen migrants had chemical burns and two of the burn cases required hospital admission.

On 20 March, about 120 migrants were rescued off Az Zawiyah. The migrants were taken to Shuhada Al Nasr detention centre. The rescue operation was carried out by the Libyan Coast Guard.

On 20 March, some 200 migrants were also rescued off Az Zawiyah, including seven women and two children. There were reports of 10 bodies retrieved – one was a woman.

So far in 2017 IOM Libya reports 3,403 rescues at sea, with remains of 161 victims recovered.

Worldwide, Missing Migrants reports fatalities on this date top 1,000 (1,018, see chart, below), with the Mediterranean region accounting for the largest proportion of deaths – over half of the global total.

Region

2017

2016

Mediterranean

525

553

Europe

13

15

Middle East

10

33

North Africa

198

542

Horn of Africa*

64

87

Sub-Saharan Africa

12

23

Southeast Asia

44

35

East Asia

0

0

US/Mexico

61

53

Central America

10

20

Caribbean

81

38

South America

0

10

Total

1,018

1,409

* ‘Horn of Africa’ includes deaths in the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea.

Missing Migrants has recorded this year, 64 in the Horn of Africa region, including 42 Somalis killed last week (17 March) off Hodeidah, Yemen, and two migrants shot in the Gulf of Aden near Yemen on 19 March. Last year to this date, Missing Migrants reported 87 killed in the Horn of Africa region.

IOM Yemen reported over the weekend that thus far a total of 104 survivors have been rescued from Friday’s tragedy near Hodeidah, out of which 13 critical cases were referred to hospitals in Hodeidah. The remaining 91 survivors with minor injuries, trauma and shock were placed in Hodeidah Detention Center, where irregular migrants are being kept for entering the country illegally.

The rescue operation mainly used fishing boats to collect the remains of 42 victims, some of which were placed in a limited capacity mortuary in Hodeidah while the remaining were kept in a fish cooler in Hodeidah fish market. The search for missing victims is ongoing.

“The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has responded to this tragic incident by providing lifesaving assistance to survivors at both Hodeidah Detention Centre and hospitals where the critical cases are being treated,” said Laurent De Boeck, IOM Yemen Chief of Mission. “IOM provided food and non-food items, medical and psychosocial assistance and WASH services. Additionally, IOM medical teams are closely following up the referred cases, facilitating examination, diagnostics and treatment process including surgeries which will be entirely covered by IOM,” he added.

IOM is providing lifesaving assistance including food and non-food items, medical and psychosocial and WASH services to migrants held in detention centres in Yemen while they are being processed for voluntary return. IOM assistance is also extended to detained asylum seekers and vulnerable Yemeni prisoners.

Additionally, IOM established and is managing two Migrants Response Point (MRP) sites in Hodeidah and Aden, where the most vulnerable migrants including elderly, unaccompanied minors and separated children are being assisted. The establishment of additional MRPs in Hodeidah, Sana’a and Aden is in process.

For the latest Mediterranean update infographic:
http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170321_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41.79.103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider at IOM Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 17 Email: sschneider@iom.int
IOM Yemen, Saba Malme, Sana’a, Tel: + 967 736 800 329 (mobile), Email: smalme@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey; Tel. (Direct): +90 (0)312 454 3048, Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285, Email: adwommoh@iom.int or Mazen Aboulhosn, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: maboulhosn@iom.int
IOM Libya: Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int  or Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

For information or interview requests in French:
Florence Kim, IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:21Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

ACP-EU Migration Programme Meets to Counter Human Trafficking, Migrant Smuggling

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:16
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Guyana - IOM is kicking off a three-day inter-regional meeting today (21/03) in Georgetown, Guyana focusing on trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants.

The “Peer-to-Peer Exchange Meeting” brings together 70 delegates and experts from the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) States and from the European Union (EU) to look at the most effective means to counter both phenomena at the local, regional and global levels.

“This is an excellent opportunity to learn from the experiences of experts from these three regions in preventing and responding to both trafficking in persons and migrant smuggling, including protection of victims and migrants who have suffered human rights abuses,” said IOM’s Rosilyne Borland, who will be facilitating the event. 

Both trafficking in human beings and migrant smuggling are highly profitable businesses that exploit people and involve transnational criminal networks. They are also very hard to be traced by the authorities. Trafficking and smuggling are defined as two distinct crimes within the United Nations Trans-crime Convention and related protocols. Trafficking in Human Beings is a crime against an individual while Smuggling of Migrants is a crime against a state. 

“It must be understood, however, that in spite of this difference, states usually have the same cadre of officials dealing with both issues,” said IOM’s Agueda Marin, Regional Thematic Specialist for counter-trafficking in human beings.

Running through Thursday (23/03), this is the second peer-to-peer exchange meeting organized for stakeholders under IOM’s “ACP-EU Migration Action” programme. The meetings are designed to provide an interactive forum to exchange challenges, lessons learned, and good practices identified to date in the implementation of the programme. They will also build on the recommendations spelled out on the ACP-EU Dialogue documents.

Three of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed by UN Member States in September 2015 make specific reference to ending trafficking in human beings.

UN agencies working in the fields of counter-trafficking and counter-smuggling of migrants are participating in the meeting and will contribute to drafting concrete recommendations to the ACP-EU Dialogue to reach the targets set out in the SDGs. Representatives from UN Women, UNODC and UNICEF will speak to the issues of eliminating all forms of violence against all women and girls in public and private spheres (SDG 5.2), ending abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence and torture against children (SDG 16.2), and ending modern slavery and human trafficking (target 8.7).

IOM’s ACP-EU Migration Action, launched in June 2014, provides tailored technical support on migration to countries in all ACP regions. To date it has received 58 technical assistance requests from 44 ACP governments and 5 regional organizations. A third of these requests directly concern either counter-trafficking or counter-smuggling activities, with all of them touching the targets set up in the SDGs in one way or another.

The programme is financed by the 10th European Development Fund (EDF) and supported by the ACP Secretariat and the EU. 

In 2010, the ACP Group of States and the European Union agreed on a Joint Declaration on Migration and Development that was endorsed by the ACP-EU Council in June 2010. In the declaration the parties committed to strengthen and deepen cooperation in the Governance of migration and coordination of dialogue built on strategies to address irregular migration, enable regular migration, and migration and development, including issues related to counter-trafficking in persons and counter-smuggling of migrants.

Future peer-to-peer meetings will be held on other areas covered by the programme, such as visas and readmission. 

For further information, please contact the ACP-EU Migration Action at the IOM Regional Office in Brussels, Tel: +32 2 287 78 10, Email: ACPEUmigrationaction@iom.int, Web: www.acpeumigrationaction.iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:11Image: Region-Country: AmericaGuyanaThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Libya Releases 2016 Displacement Trends Analysis Report

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:10
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Libya - IOM Libya last week (17/03) published DTM Libya’s Internal Displacement in Libya – 2016 in Review which presents a comprehensive overview of Libya’s human mobility patterns, trends and dynamics for 2016. The report also provides an analysis of Libya’s internally displaced persons (IDP) displacement drivers, shelter settings, primary needs and demographics categorized by period of displacement.

The report contains data collected from across seven rounds of Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) data collection. By December 2016, DTM had recorded 303,608 IDPs and 453,540 returnees identified across the whole of Libya.

2016 was an important turning point in the dynamics of displacement and returns in the country. In the first half of the year, many IDPs were residing mainly in the regions of Banghazi, Al Wahat, Tripoli and Misratah. Most of the identified IDPs had been displaced following the eruption of conflict in 2014. The number of IDPs identified increased between May and August 2016 due to the fighting in Sirte. With the de-escalation of conflict in various parts of the country in the latter part of the year, the number of identified IDPs decreased while the number of returnees rose.

While most IDPs were recorded as residing in private accommodation, their reduced access to livelihood opportunities has left them particularly vulnerable to the increase in prices and rent as well as the current cash shortages. IDPs were also acutely affected by the limited availability of medical services, basic food and non-food items (NFIs); this has been confirmed by the latest round of data.

Most IDPs who returned to their homes in 2015 and 2016 went back to the regions of Al Jifarah, Banghazi, Al Jabal al Gharbi and Tripoli. The shelter setting for most returnees was their former home.

“This report provides an opportunity to better understand the context underpinning displacement in Libya,” noted DTM Programme Manager Daniel Salmon. “Shifts in the data are better understood when we examine and contextualize the factors that influenced the movement of IDPs and returnees in the country.”

DTM has been an authoritative source of information on internal displacement in Libya since its establishment in the country in late 2015. DTM data has been used by UN partners to identify and analyze the needs of the most vulnerable groups in Libya and to advocate for more targeted humanitarian assistance to them.

DTM has updated its methodology for 2017 to have a stronger focus on the primary needs of returnees and to gather more sectorial data for each area in response to shifts in displacement trends. DTM will also gather more multi-sectorial data on conditions in each baladiya (municipality) and on community relations between the population groups residing therein.

This report is the latest from the Libya DTM’s Mobility Tracking Module. Mobility Tracking facilitates the regular collection and dissemination of data on the numbers and locations of IDP populations as well as migration flows to, through and from Libya. It also captures Libya’s baseline demographic data on the number, age, sex, gender, origin and intention of the county’s IDP, returnee and migrant populations.

DTM informs the humanitarian response in Libya by identifying priority needs and regularly providing updates as the situation develops to facilitate the delivery of timely targeted humanitarian assistance and provide an evidence base for wider policy responses. 

For the full report and all other DTM publications, please see www.globaldtm.info/libya

For further information, please contact IOM Libya. Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Daniel Salmon, Email: dsalmon@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 17:03Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesInternally Displaced PersonsDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

New IOM Website Links Diaspora Expertise to Countries of Origin

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 10:03
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Netherlands - IOM has launched a new website linking diaspora expertise in the Netherlands to selected host institutions in the countries of origin. The website is part of the Connecting Diaspora for Development (CD4D) project.

Through short physical and online assignments, professional diaspora experts are linked to key institutions identified by the six target countries: Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Morocco, Sierra Leone and Somalia.

The website provides relevant information about the priority sectors and institutions in all target countries and an overview of all vacancies with host institutions. Interested candidates can apply directly via the website.

Selected participants are encouraged to give visibility to their engagement with the host institution via blogs and vlogs on the website. The strengthened connections between diaspora individuals and the host institutions will contribute to reconstruction and sustainable development in the countries of origin.

One such CD4D participant is Aziz Arrouchdi, a social worker with an international track record related to training counsellors working with vulnerable young people. Arrouchdi was assigned to the Rawabit Assadaka Association in Tangier, Morocco, which empowers 8 to 18 year olds from socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods by offering activities in arts, education and sports.

He has coached the centre’s instructors in social and psychological guidance. He has also developed a special training kit manual and coached trainers how to train other staff involved in the centre’s activities. His key motivation for this assignment was to share his knowledge as a sociologist and psychological specialist to help create opportunities for a better future for young people from underprivileged backgrounds.

The CD4D project is funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and is a continuation of IOM’s successful Temporary Return of Qualified Nationals (TRQN) project. 

Find out more about CD4D here: http://www.connectingdiaspora.org/en/

For further information, please contact Marian Lenshoek at IOM in The Hague, Tel. + 31 651 576013, Email: mlenshoek@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:59Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaNetherlandsThemes: IOMMigration ResearchOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Oxford Conference Addresses Needs of Migrants in Countries in Crisis

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:59
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Switzerland - IOM presented the Migrants in Countries in Crisis (MICIC) Initiative Guidelines at a major international conference organized by the Refugee Studies Centre at Keble College, Oxford, last week (16-17/03). 

The conference Beyond Crisis: Rethinking Refugee Studies looked at ways to assess knowledge, evidence, practices and concepts needed to understand and respond to contemporary challenges linked to crises and forced displacement.

The conference also brought together a range of academics, policymakers and practitioners, with the aim of strengthening the research agenda and scholarly community on this topic, and more effectively engage with the long-term challenges of forced displacement.

IOM was represented by Heather Komenda, Lorenzo Guadagno and Sanjula Weerasinghe, whose presentations were featured in a panel on Frameworks to Address Situational and Embodied Vulnerabilities of Migrants, addressed from a practitioner perspective. The panel explored policy and practice-oriented interventions to better address barriers to accessing information, resources and assistance migrants may experience in crisis situations and to better harness their capacities, both to reduce their vulnerability and to improve the resilience of their communities of origin and destination. 

In particular, the MICIC Initiative Guidelines to Protect Migrants in Countries Experiencing Conflict or Natural Disaster, presented by Weerasinghe, highlighted the benefits to be derived from preparatory actions, which provide migrants with the necessary conditions and tools to enhance their resilience, as migrants face different challenges to citizens in the context of disasters and conflicts.

Legal status, isolation, language barriers, and documentation requirements present unique hurdles that often prevent migrants from accessing safety. Yet within migrant communities, there are skills and capacities that can be leveraged to address these same vulnerabilities. Interventions are most effective when implemented well before a crisis erupts.

IOM also presented on the importance of including migrants in Disaster Risk Management with Guadagno highlighting how this need has been explicitly recognized in a number of global policy discussions, and enshrined in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030.

“Addressing migrants’ needs more effectively requires extending emergency management coordination to many nontraditional actors, including consulates and embassies, civil society organizations, and migrants themselves,” highlighted Guadagno in his intervention. “This is a much broader set of stakeholders than those usually considered by mandated emergency management institutions.”

He also outlined the efforts IOM has been undertaking in this field under the MICIC Initiative. These included gathering relevant practices and generating evidence and guidance on the topic, supporting capacity-building of staff from relevant institutions in selected countries around the world, and setting up national coordination mechanisms to improve inclusion of migrants in Disaster Risk Reduction and Management work.

IOM’s presentations were complemented by contributions by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) which launched a smart practices database, another important resource that can inspire practitioners to develop new approaches for meeting migrant needs. This collection of skills and knowledge aims to ensure that the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and other partners have the knowledge, resources and capacities to support vulnerable migrants.

For further information, please contact Sanjula Weerasinghe at IOM Geneva. Tel: +41 22 717 9190, Email: sweerasinghe@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:53Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Capacity BuildingOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Over 400 Participate in Cross-Border Crisis Simulation Exercise in Niger

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:51
Language English

Niger - More than 400 participants representing communities, authorities, civil society and security forces participated in a crisis simulation exercise organized by IOM Niger last week (14/3) in close partnership with the authorities.

Among the partners were the Prime Minister's Office, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Humanitarian Action and Natural Disaster Management, and the Ministry of Health.

The exercise was held as part of the project Engaging Communities in Border Management in Niger, funded by the United States Department of State, as part of the Flintlock 2017 programme.

The exercise was held in Zinder, southern Niger, close to the border areas regularly suffering from terrorist incidents linked to the Boko Haram armed group. It tested the reaction and coordination capacities of the authorities in the context of a sudden event which would result in a massive population displacement.

The main objective of the project is to integrate the border populations as a key player in the response to cross-border crisis but, above all, in the prevention of such a crisis. Communities are the first to witness and observer a crisis situation, whether affecting health or safety, and, as a result, the way they communicate this to the competent authorities is a priority.

The conclusions of the Flintlock exercise will help determine the points that need to be strengthened and will outline the national contingency plan in response to cross-border crises.

“This exercise has once again shown the commitment and determination of the Nigerien authorities and populations to work together to prevent and respond to sudden crises,” said Giuseppe Loprete, Chief of Mission at IOM Niger. “We hope through the project to further strengthen this determination and coordination among all key players,” he concluded.

The capacity-building process for crisis response will continue by organizing a second simulation exercise later this year, in support of the contingency plan developed jointly with all the authorities present along the borders.

At the end of this exercise, three 40 square metre tents were handed over to the Zinder Governorate, while 300 hygiene kits were provided to the participating members of the communities.

For further information, please contact Marina Schramm at IOM Niger, Tel: +227 9050 3966, E-mail: mschramm@iom.int

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:49Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastNigerThemes: Capacity BuildingIntegrated Border ManagementDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM, Partner Train Business Managers on Responsible Recruitment in Thailand

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:49
Language English

Thailand - Over half of the world’s 21 million victims of forced labour are found in the Asia-Pacific region. In Thailand, recent reports on labour exploitation in the Thai fishing and agriculture sectors have heightened public attention on the issues of forced labour and human trafficking. This has prompted multinational companies to re-examine their global supply chains and put in place measures to prevent abuse.

In an effort to further promote the ethical recruitment of migrants and social accountability in Thailand, IOM and the Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI) of the Foreign Trade Association (FTA) have partnered together to jointly organize a two-day workshop for BSCI members starting today (21/3).

The training targets over 50 human resource and sourcing managers from Thai suppliers to major European importers and supermarket chains.

Aimed at sensitizing participants to the risks migrants may encounter during the recruitment process and employment, the workshop also encourages companies to implement responsible business practices and develop mitigation strategies.

As part of the training, IOM will share best practices in the areas of ethical recruitment and counter-trafficking including minimum standards for employment contracts, safe migration campaign and handling suspected cases of human trafficking.

BSCI will train participants on risk identification, due diligence and remediation procedures, and also highlight obligations suppliers must meet as part of its code of conduct.

“Consumers have become increasingly discerning in the products they buy. Companies that look after the wellbeing of migrant workers will ultimately benefit from decreased business risk, greater productivity and increased customer trust,” said IOM Thailand Chief of Mission, Dana Graber Ladek.   

The workshop is the first of a series of trainings conducted by IOM in partnership with BSCI for Thai producers focused on responsible recruitment, labour supply chain management and social compliance.

“This collaboration is proving very effective to bring to Thai producers the knowledge and hands-on experience they require to meet legal obligations and increase transparency in the recruitment of migrant workers,” said Anna Stancher, BSCI Social Programmes Manager.

The trainings are designed with the private sector in mind with materials adopted from IOM’s Corporate Responsibility in Eliminating Slavery and Trafficking (CREST) initiative.

IOM considers partnerships with the private sector a priority as part of its wider strategy to combat trafficking in persons and promote migrant rights.  

For further information please contact Petra Neumann at IOM Thailand, Email: pneumann@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9333, or Reuben Lim, Email: rlim@iom.int, Tel: +66 2 343 9370

 

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:46Image: Region-Country: AsiaThailandThemes: Capacity BuildingCounter-TraffickingLabour MigrationDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Egypt Opens Migration Health Assessment Centre

IOM - News - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 09:46
Language English

Egypt - IOM Egypt opened its migration health assessment centre (MHAC) on March 16th to provide full health assessments to refugees and migrants migrating from Egypt.

The centre provides services to self-paying Egyptian migrants and refugees going through the resettlement process to five countries: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

The centre also offers full health assessments, including immunization and pre-departure medical screenings with presumptive treatment, to all applicants based on each receiving country’s relevant guidelines.

It is a one-stop shop for all health screening related activities including registration, counselling, nursing operations, physical examination, phlebotomy/lab services, radiology and vaccination. A complete set up is present to cater for pre-departure services along with presumptive treatment administration.

“MHAC has already received empanelment for all major destination countries and secured the right to carry out health assessments for self-paying Egyptian migrants as well, ranking Egypt as the second country in the MENA region to reach the health assessment goal of health assessments for all major countries,” said Dr. Asma Nadeem, IOM Egypt’s Head of Migration Health Unit.

Since January 2015, IOM has conducted around 5,300 health assessments for various countries, 4,500 pre-departure medical screenings and 2,900 presumptive treatment administrations.

For further information, please contact Dr. Asma Nadeem at IOM Egypt. Tel: +202-27365140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int

Posted: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 16:38Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEgyptThemes: Migration HealthDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Welcomes Milestone as 10,000 Asylum Seekers Relocated from Greece under EU Plan

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 11:45
Language English

Greece - Over 10,000 asylum seekers have now been relocated from Greece to other European Union (EU) and Associated States since the start of the EU relocation programme according to IOM, which is implementing the scheme.

Since the beginning of March, 367 people left Greece for Belgium, Estonia, Germany, Malta, Portugal, Slovenia and Spain bringing the total number of people relocated from Greece to 10,004.  Another 475 people were relocated from Italy to Belgium, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Slovenia in the same period. This brings the total number of people relocated from both Italy and Greece to 14,439 since the scheme’s launch in October 2015.

IOM Deputy Director General Laura Thompson welcomed the new milestone and highlighted the benefits of the programme during an official visit to Greece this week.

“The unique strength of the EU Relocation programme lies in its double impact both at the political level and for individuals,” said Ambassador Thompson. “Not only does relocation demonstrate cooperation, solidarity and a genuine Union, it has also made a big difference for each of the nearly 14,500 people that have relocated from Greece and Italy to start new lives in other EU member states.”  

“IOM continues to work with the EU, Greece and Italy as well as the countries receiving these men, women, children and families to help realize the full potential of this programme,” she added.

Eugenio Ambrosi, Director of IOM’s Regional Office for the EU, Norway and Switzerland, said that the 10,000 milestone, while short of the initial target, clearly shows more commitment from EU member states and determination to accelerate the process for those in need of international protection. 

“We have seen a steady increase of pledges and acceptance from participating EU countries in the past few months. At this rate, there will be a further 15,000 to 18,000 relocations from Greece by the end of the programme,” said Ambrosi.

“Yet we cannot rest at ease because the overall numbers are too low given the needs in Greece and the commitments that were made. We continue to encourage EU member states to follow through fully on their commitments,” he added. 

A record number of people were relocated from Italy and Greece in February 2017, with more than 1,200 relocations to 13 different EU countries. According to current statistics, this month is on track to break February’s record number of relocations.   

Germany (3,093), France (2,764) and the Netherlands (1,486) have received the most asylum seekers to date under the scheme, mainly from Greece, while the European Commission has lauded Finland and Malta for being on track to meet their respective target numbers. 

As of 28 February 2017, Syrians comprised most Italy and Greece relocation beneficiaries (58 percent), followed by Eritreans (29 percent), Iraqis (10 percent) and other nationalities (3 percent). Women accounted for 38 percent of those relocated; 33 percent of the beneficiaries were under the age of 18.

There has been a notable upward trend in relocations from Greece where more than half of the overall progress to date has been achieved just in the last five months of the programme. More than one third of the 10,000 beneficiaries that traveled under relocation from Greece to date have done so in the last 100 days.

Relocation beneficiaries to date from Greece were mainly Syrian (81 percent) and Iraqi (14 percent). The programme has also relocated 207 unaccompanied migrant children from Greece, with Finland accepting the largest number.  

The programme is being implemented by IOM in close cooperation with Greek and Italian authorities and other agencies, with the continuing support of the European Commission, EU member and associated states, and other partners.

To help the migrants integrate in their new communities, IOM runs pre-departure orientation sessions, which provide useful information on rights and obligations, as well as on initial post-arrival reception and early integration assistance.

Vulnerable beneficiaries, including unaccompanied migrant children, pregnant women, newborns and migrants with medical needs are given additional support and care through specialized services, including best interest assessments for minors. Where necessary, IOM also provides medical escorts, as well as escorts for unaccompanied minors or large groups, to assist them during their travel.

Interpreters and cultural mediators are in contact with beneficiaries throughout the relocation process to ensure that they understand the procedures and can communicate any concerns or questions. IOM staff are also present at airports of departure to provide assistance during boarding and reception assistance at transit airports and final destinations.

IOM has so far assisted over 400 group relocation movements to 24 European countries participating in the programme.

For updated statistics on EU relocations, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

More information on IOM and the EU Relocation Programme can be found at: http://eea.iom.int/index.php/what-we-do/eu-relocation

Portraits of EU Relocation: https://greece.iom.int/en/photos-and-videos and https://greece.iom.int/en/migrants-stories

For further information, please contact the IOM Regional Office in Brussels: Jo De Backer Tel: +32 2 287 71 15, Email: jdebacker@iom.int or Ryan Schroeder Tel: +32 2 287 71 16, Email: rschroeder@iom.int. Or Besim Ajeti at IOM Athens, Tel: +30 210 9919040 Ext. 121, Email: bajeti@iom.int. Or Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Rome, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 18:40Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaGreeceThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsRefugee and Asylum IssuesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals Reach 19,722, Deaths: 525

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 11:39
Language English

Switzerland - IOM reports that 19,722 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2017 through 15 March, over 80 percent arriving in Italy and the rest in Spain and Greece. This compares with 154,416 through the first 74 days of 2016.

These arrival numbers do not include 333 migrants that came to port in Italy on 16 March, according to updates from Italy’s Ministry of Interior. Those new arrivals would push this year’s Mediterranean arrival numbers over 20,000 on March 16, and to over 16,000 for Italy alone. That puts 2017’s arrival rate to Italy considerably ahead of the 2015’s first three-month total of 10,165, and just below the 2016 three-month total of 18,777 (see chart below).

 

  Arrivals by sea to Italy
January - December 2015/2016
(source: Italian MoI)  

2016

2015

January

5,273

3,528

February

3,828

4,354

March

9,676

2,283

April

9,149

16,056

May

19,925

21,231

June

22,371

22,877

July

23,552

23,210

August

21,294

22,610

September

16,975

15,922

October

27,384

8,916

November

13,962

3,219

December

8,047

9,636

 

IOM’s Missing Migrants Project reports that the number of Mediterranean deaths – 525 – exceeds by 29 the total of 496 reported during the same period in 2016.  Julia Black of IOM’s Global Migration of Data Analysis Centre explained, “Already 525 migrant deaths and disappearances have been recorded in the Mediterranean as of 16 March 2017, an eight percent increase over the number recorded at this point in 2016.” She pointed to these key differences in the two years’ data:

  • 481 of the 525 missing migrants recorded in the Mediterranean overall drowned in the Central Mediterranean, compared to 97 between 1 January and 15 March 2016;
  • In short. almost five times as many deaths have been recorded on this route this year compared to 1 January – 15 March 2016, which represents a 396 percent increase;
  • Only 2 deaths have been recorded in the Eastern Mediterranean this year, compared to 362 between 1 January and 15 March 2016;
  • This represents a 99.4 per cent decrease in deaths this year on the Eastern Mediterranean compared to 1 January – 15 March 2016.

Worldwide, Missing Migrants reports fatalities on this date are approaching 1,000, with the Mediterranean accounting for the largest proportion of deaths – 525 of 973 (see chart, below).

Missing Migrants recorded 151 deaths in North Africa, part of a release of new data from the Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat’s Mixed Migration Monitoring Mechanism Initiative dating back to November 2016. Black explained these new data: “Of the 198 recorded through March 16, 2017, 110 (or 56 percent) of deaths occurred in Libya; 70 (or 35 percent) occurred in Sudan. Overall, about 45 percent of these fatalities were reported to have occurred in deserts across Libya, Sudan, and Egypt.”

US-Mexico border deaths have been recorded this year at a rate of nearly one per day – 61 in 74 days – which is well ahead of 2016’s total, 47, at this point last year.

For all of 2016, Missing Migrants reported 400 border deaths – a daily rate just slightly ahead of 2017’s thus far. With summer, just weeks away, IOM is concerned the death toll along the border could climb past last year’s total. IOM researchers note that Mexico has recorded 12 drowning deaths of migrants so far this year along the country’s river border with Texas. Last year researchers counted 36 Texas river drownings of migrants – another indicator that deaths are occurring at a faster pace this year, despite a drop in overall traffic.

Meanwhile, deaths in the Caribbean Sea basin in 2017 have reached 81 through March 16, more than three times last year’s total now. IOM’s Global Migration of Data Analysis Centre noted that in all of 2016, 105 migrants died or went missing in the Caribbean Sea, which was an increase of 89 percent over the 55 deaths recorded in 2015.

The total number of immigrant fatalities in 2016 was recorded in 14 incidents, while there were 8 incidents in 2015 and 10 in 2014. There have been only two major drowning incidents reported in the region so far in 2017.

A complete analysis of 2016 Migrant Deaths and Disappearances Worldwide follows below:

Deaths of Migrants & Refugees: 1 January 2016 - 16 March 2016 vs. 1 January - 16 March 2017 Region

2017

2016

Mediterranean

525

496

Europe

13

15

Middle East

10

32

North Africa

198

393

Horn of Africa

20

84

Sub-Saharan Africa

12

23

Southeast Asia

44

35

East Asia

0

0

US/Mexico

61

47

Central America

9

17

Caribbean

81

29

South America

0

10

Total

973

1,181

For the latest Mediterranean Update infographic:
http://migration.iom.int/docs/MMP/170317_Mediterranean_Update.pdf

For latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:
Joel Millman at IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo at IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
Sabine Schneider at IOM Germany, Tel: +49 30 278 778 17 Email: sschneider@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +30 210 9919040, +30 210 9912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey, Tel. (Direct): +90 (0)312 454 3048, Mobile: +90 (533) 698 7285, Email: adwommoh@iom.int, or Mazen Aboulhosn, Tel: +9031245-51202, Email: maboulhosn@iom.int
IOM Libya: Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int  or Christine Petré, Tel. (Direct):  +216 29 240 448, Email: chpetre@iom.int
Hicham Hasnaoui at IOM Morocco, Tel: + 212 5 37 65 28 81, Email: hhasnaoui@iom.int

For information or interview requests in French:
Florence Kim, IOM Geneva, Tel: +41 79 103 03 42, Email: fkim@iom.int
Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int

 

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 18:35Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaSwitzerlandThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Migrant Deaths and Disappearances Worldwide: 2016 Analysis

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 11:34
Language English

Germany - A new data briefing produced by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) highlights a 27 percent increase in migrant deaths worldwide during 2016 compared to 2015. The number of migrant deaths and disappearances recorded by IOM increased significantly in many regions of the world, including the Mediterranean, the Middle East, North Africa, and Latin America.

Issue 8 of IOM’s GMDAC data briefing series, titled “Migrant Deaths and Disappearances Worldwide: 2016 Analysis”, provides an in-depth look at the recorded data on migrant deaths and disappearances throughout 2016. Key figures for regions in which migrant deaths have been recorded – namely, the Mediterranean Sea, Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the Americas – are explored.

“In 2016, IOM documented the deaths of 7,763 migrants worldwide,” said GMDAC Director Frank Laczko. “This represents an increase of 27 percent compared to 2015, and of 47 percent compared to 2014.”

Data collected by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project show that more than 5,085 migrants died in the Mediterranean in 2016 – a 34 percent increase compared to the 3,784 recorded 2015. This increase in deaths occurred despite increased search and rescue efforts compared with the previous year. 

The increase of fatalities along the Central Mediterranean route is striking. In 2016, the number of deaths in the Central Mediterranean was the highest number recorded by IOM since 2014. The number of migrant deaths in the Mediterranean is higher than any year since at least 2000. The average number of deaths per incident in the Central Mediterranean almost doubled last year, from an average of 12 deaths per incident in 2015 to 33 deaths per incident in 2016.

The briefing also discusses the increase in the number of migrant deaths recorded in Africa. At least 1,280 migrant deaths were recorded in North Africa in 2016, nearly double the 672 deaths recorded in the region in 2015. Though this increase may be indicative of improved data collection efforts in the region, data compiled by Missing Migrants Project indicate that migration routes through southern Libya, in eastern Sudan and southern Egypt are highly risky for migrants. 

The number of migrant deaths recorded in the Americas, including the Caribbean, also increased significantly in 2016. IOM´s Missing Migrants project recorded 707 deaths in the Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016, an increase of 43 percent over the 493 recorded in 2015.

The increase in migrant deaths and disappearances across many regions of the world, as highlighted by the data discussed in the briefing, indicate that migration became less – not more – safe.

The data briefing can be found here: https://gmdac.iom.int/gmdac-data-briefing-8

For further information please contact: Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 18:25Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaGermanyThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesMissing MigrantsOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Iraq, Qatar’s Red Crescent Society Open Field Hospital in Mosul

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 11:23
Language English

Iraq - IOM Iraq, with Qatar’s Red Crescent Society (QRCS), officially opened its 50-bed field hospital in Mosul, boasting two operation theatres and post-operative care to receive and treat cases from internally displaced persons (IDPs) from West Mosul.

Set up in the Ninewa governorate, the field hospital also has an emergency department with 10 beds that can cater for serious emergency cases, including injuries.

With reports increasing that civilians inside Mosul are on the rise from mortar rounds, gunfire and bombs, from the battle between Iraqis and the coalition on one side and ISIL on the other, the services provided by the field hospital located in Hammam al-Alil, south West of Mosul, will be paramount.

Since its opening on Wednesday (15/03) IOM’s field hospital has been flooded with patients from West Mosul. The team received 30 cases of injuries on Wednesday and another 15 yesterday (16/03) and performed three general surgeries on war victims, including one orthopedic.

With the health system massively under-funded vis-à-vis the Mosul crisis and with less than a handful of trauma hospitals serving those injured from West Mosul, IOM’s field hospital will be vital in providing services to the entire catchment area south east of Mosul.

Located near the front lines, two adjacent houses of two floors each have been renovated by IOM in partnership with QRCS, to establish the much-needed field hospital in Hammam al-Alil, south East of Mosul.

With support and funds from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), QRCS and the Government of Kuwait, the field hospital is equipped with two operational theaters, an Intensive Care Unit (ICU), an X-ray unit to be installed soon, a laboratory unit, a pharmacy, sterilization unit and equipment as well as a blood bank to help it cope with the new exodus of displaced civilians pouring out from West Mosul.  

Blood supply from Mosul Blood Bank has also been arranged with Ninewa Department of Health coordinator and the Blood Bank manager, with a first shipment of 50 blood units already delivered.

A ward of 50 beds and an emergency department equipped with 10 beds have been set up to cater for the needs of patients and victims of war.

Ten specialist surgeons will lead the team and field hospital made of general, orthopedic, cardiologists, pediatric and vascular surgeons, as well as well as two anesthetics.

Another 10 general practitioners/physicians (GPs) have also been hired to deal with the IDPs' day-to-day ailments. A 42-member staff ranging from nurses, pharmacists to lab and X-ray technicians, also supports the team.

Two generators will be installed next Saturday (18/03) to ensure continuous power for patients and to operate equipment during the frequent power cuts in the area.

Another team of 25 non-medical staff has also been assigned to provide guards, ambulance drivers, registrars and to provide laundry, cooking and logistics services for the field hospital.

On Monday (13/03), a mobile clinic funded by DFID was transported to Hammam al-Alil camp where the bulk of IDPs first transit for registration and screening, before being transported to camps or out of camp locations.

Another mobile clinic donated by Kuwait will also be sent to Hammam al-Alil in the next week to cope with the influx of IDPs and provide the necessary on the ground health care needed by many. IOM Mobile teams are present at the screening zone and Hammam al-Alil daily, providing health service for newly arrivals IDPs. 

Many of the staff and members working in the field hospital are from Mosul itself. They come with both experience and knowledge of the needs of their people and the suffering they endured under ISIL.

Dr. Yousef Muayad, 47, is a GP and pediatrician who graduated from Mosul University in 1994. He also trained in child psychology in the United States. Until recently he was the head of administration in Mosul’s main Salam hospital, which was ISIL's number one hospital and once a major health center for people on the east side of Mosul.

“We were prisoners in a large prison and working in the hospital with ISIL rules and regulations was quite challenging,” Dr. Muayad said.

“I saw myself as a prisoner who could only move within a certain periphery. While it was my duty to remain as I had taken an oath, I could not send my children out to finish their education (also in medicine) for fear for their lives. Those who got caught leaving simply got killed,” he said.

Instead Dr. Muayad remained in Mosul serving in the hospital and his private clinic and, as he said, trying hard as the hospital administrator to protect the younger medics from the ire of ISIL.

On one occasion Dr. Muayad recounts receiving a sick 14-year-old girl in his clinic. An elderly man brought the girl who was suffering from a throat infection. She was dressed in a black loose gown with her face covered.

When he examined her and as he was writing her a prescription of antibiotics and in typical Arab form, he casually told the elderly man to take care of his young daughter.

“To my surprise, the man turned to me and said with a laugh, ‘This is not my daughter but my sabiya (sex slave).’”

“I felt numb, angry and helpless. She was only a child and there was nothing I could do to save her. It was just too awful,” he recounted.

Dr. Muayad speaks with excitement about his new post in IOM’s field hospital where he will be able to serve IDPs from his community.

But he also talks with bitterness about the days and times when Mosul was "occupied".  

In Hammam al-Alil transit reception where IDPs escaping from West Mosul were flooding in daily, an unattended young paraplegic girl lay helplessly on a stretcher, amongst the crowds. Family members taking turns carrying her had brought her out on a stretcher to safety. She arrived with a severe ear infection and her father pleaded for help. An IOM medic in the nearby mobile clinic, funded by DFID, immediately heeded his call and came to the scene. On checking the young girl, he administered the necessary medications and promised to check on her daily. 

More than 107,466 individuals (17,911 families) have fled West Mosul in the last 20 days according to IOM’s DTM, the first IDPs began leaving their areas on the 25th of February, 7 days after the start of the military operations by Iraqi forces to retake West Mosul.

The numbers include some of those who have opted to seek refuge out of camps. IOM’s DTM is adding out of camps locations and numbers as soon as the information is validated.

According to the authorities in Hammam al-Alil, the total number of IDP families that transited through the screening site from the beginning of the operations until Wednesday at 4 pm is 22,529 (135,174 individuals).

Just over 95,000 IDPs from West Mosul are sheltering in camps with the remainder staying in areas recaptured from ISIL in East Mosul.

IOM is now managing to collect information from authorities in Hammam al-Alil screening site. Reportedly - between 14 March at 4 pm and 15 March at 4 pm – 1,219 IDP families (estimated 7,314 individuals)

Since the beginning of the Mosul operations on October 17, 2016, the cumulative number of IDPs for both East and West reached 54,459 families (326,754 individuals.)

Currently 42,480 families (254,880 individuals) remain displaced with 11,979 families (71,874 individuals) returning home, mostly to the areas retaken in East Mosul.

The latest DTM Emergency Tracking figures on displacement from Mosul operations are available at: http://iraqdtm.iom.int/EmergencyTracking.aspx.

For further information, please contact IOM Iraq: Hala Jaber, Tel. +964 751 740 1654, Email: hjaberbent@iom.int 

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 18:17Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastIraqThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Launches Migrant Presence Monitoring in Turkey as Syrian Conflict Enters Seventh Year

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 11:16
Language English

Turkey - With over 3.5 million migrants and refugees in Turkey, IOM this week (13/03) signed a Migrant Presence Monitoring (MPM) agreement with Turkey’s Directorate General of Migration Management (DGMM) to better understand migrant population movements and needs.  

In response to the ongoing Syria Crisis and the Mediterranean Crisis, MPM will track key demographics and quantitative data of Turkey’s migrant population, both within the country and the external flows to Europe.  

“Sustained regional conflict highlights the need for in-depth, accurate information on migratory flows, the needs of migrants and refugees living in Turkey, and on those who are in transit to reach Europe,” said Lado Gvilava, IOM Turkey Chief of Mission.

“Too often humanitarian and resilience responses are based upon ad hoc approaches.  MPM provides a valuable tool to governments, aid agencies and civil society to develop strategic responses that will provide a lasting positive impact on both host communities and the migrant population,” added Gvilava.

Through baseline assessments, migrant surveys and flow monitoring, MPM will collect data on external migration flows and those within Turkey to assist governments, humanitarians and protection stakeholder to have a better understanding of the scope and structure of migration movements in Turkey.  The programme will also build Turkey’s capacity to collect and analyse national and regional migration information to support evidence-based migration policies at local, national and regional levels. 

MPM draws on the experience of over a decade of IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) in tracking vulnerable populations and helping ensure the targeted delivery of aid in Syria, Iraq, South Sudan and other countries facing both conflict and natural disasters. 

MPM will initially be launched in 15 pilot provinces with the expectation that the programme will be extended shortly throughout the entire country. 

MPM will publish a monthly country overview, situation reports, regular Flow Monitoring Surveys reports as well as detailed quarterly reports. Ad hoc reports will be published following significant findings.

Funding for MPM was provided by the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and EU’s Humanitarian Aid Department (ECHO).

More information about IOM’s MPM programme can be found at: http://migration.iom.int/europe/

For further information, please contact Abby Dwommoh, IOM Turkey, Tel: +90 312 454 3048, Email: MediaIOMTurkey@iom.int or Bekim Ajdini, Tel: +90 312 454 3059, Email: bajdini@iom.int   

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 18:11Image: Region-Country: Europe and Central AsiaTurkeyThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

IOM Nigeria Produces TV Series Encouraging Safe and Orderly Migration

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 10:51
Language English

Nigeria - The Missing Steps, an upcoming mini-series produced by IOM, will highlight the risks of irregular migration and, importantly, alternative solutions, as it seeks to raise awareness about safe migration opportunities available to Nigerians.

The project’s timing is critical as Nigerians made up the largest contingent of Africans arriving in Europe via the Mediterranean Sea in 2016. According to IOM, 37,551 Nigerians arrived in Italy last year (compared to 22,237 in 2015 and 9,000 in 2014).

Since February 2017, IOM has helped bring 504 stranded Nigerian migrants home from Libya, as part of the organization’s Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration program, further illustrating the need to sensitize Nigerians about the risks of following irregular migration routes. The educational series, made possible through a grant from the Swiss government, will be aired on national television across the country in the coming months.

"If I had known, I wouldn't have gone there. Libya is a very dangerous place," lamented Beauty Johnson, a young mother from southern Nigeria. "I travelled there because I wanted to join my sister in Italy, but now I am going home unsuccessful and empty-handed." After being stranded for five months, unable to travel to Europe, she was arrested and put into a detention camp with her baby. "I just wanted to go home to my job and normal life," she said. IOM helped fly her back safely from Libya to Lagos on February 14th.

The TV series was filmed in Nigeria and Switzerland, and features popular Nollywood actors in a bid to attract a wider audience to engage with migration themes. The series will air in English, and likely Nigerian pidgin, to engage the public around the country.

“IOM is committed to encouraging safe and orderly migration,” said Enira Krdzalic, IOM Nigeria Chief of Mission. “This television series is just one of the innovative ways we try to connect with local communities to ensure the public is aware of the opportunities that are available to travel and migrate to other countries. We expect this series, generously supported by the Swiss government, will speak to Nigerians and the experiences of many, such as those who have already attempted to follow irregular routes through Libya.”

Shooting for the series has finished and it will be scheduled for 13 weeks of broadcast starting in June, based on planning. IOM is working closely with the Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS) to ensure quality and relevant content for the series, which is being produced by a Nigerian company, C&E Productions.

For further information, please contact IOM Nigeria (Abuja): Sunday Omoyeni, Email: somoyeni@iom.int ; Enira Krdzalic, Email: ekrdzalic@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 17:46Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastNigeriaThemes: Assisted Voluntary Return and ReintegrationHumanitarian EmergenciesOthersDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Unique Partnership Seeks to Increase Developmental Role of Migration in Myanmar

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 10:45
Language English

Myanmar - One in four people in Myanmar is a migrant, many migrating in search of work. In this environment of high mobility, IOM and partners this week launched the project Twe Let – Increasing the Developmental Impact of Labour Migration through Strengthened Governance and Partnership.

Twe Let, which means "hand in hand" in the Myanmar language, seeks policy and community level partnership to increase the developmental role of migration. Supporting the efforts of the Government of Myanmar at the policy level, the project is led by the Ministry of Labour, Immigration and Population (MOLIP) and will establish Myanmar’s first-ever comprehensive migration policy.

The project supports Myanmar’s development priorities and will address international migration as well as internal migration. Additionally, it is a mechanism to "mainstream" migration into national and local sectoral development planning.

At the community level, Twe Let supports migrants and their families from rural communities ensuring that their migration decisions improve their living conditions, helping them out of poverty to lead to inclusive and sustainable development. Twe Let aims to provide direct assistance to 50,000 potential migrants and members of migrant-sending households from rural communities in 29 townships of Chin State, Mandalay Region, Magway Region, Shan State, Mon State, Kayin State and Thanintharyi Region.

The Twe Let project was launched by U Myo Aung, Permanent Secretary of MOLIP, and was attended by over 80 participants from the Republic of the Union of Myanmar, including state and regional governments, members of parliament, civil society, international organizations, the private sector and the donor, Livelihoods and Food Security Trust Fund (LIFT).

“This partnership formed between MOLIP, IOM and CSOs to implement the Twe Let project is the key to capitalize the impact of migration on Myanmar’s development. It will contribute to the protection of the rights of Myanmar migrants for safer and more gainful migration,” said U Myo Aung.

The project, worth USD 6.5 million, to be implemented over 30 months, provides aspiring migrants and their families with practical information and tools to help them take the best migration decisions and actions.

Migrant-sending families are supported through financial literacy training with the aim of increasing their ability to manage remittances and increase the developmental impact of remittances. Skills development training will also be provided for aspiring migrants and migrant‐sending households, including practical skills for employment and self-employment through migration and job-matching support to trainees.

“People choose to migrate for better lives for themselves and their families. However, migration does not guarantee a better life. Without good planning and preparation, people could end up migrating from one form of poverty to another. Through this project, we aim to support migrants and their families to place migration in their broader livelihood strategies and to increase developmental outcome of migration,” said Michiko Ito, Programme Manager at IOM Myanmar.

Twe Let is implemented by a unique consortium of organizations which include IOM, Chin Human Rights Organization (CHRO), the Mon coalition led by Mon Women’s Organization (MWO), Parami Development Network (PDN), and Pact Global Microfinance Fund (PGMF), with MOLIP as the counterpart Ministry.

National actors are central to delivering the Twe Let project throughout the targeted townships, while two international organizations renowned for their respective areas of expertise will be providing technical and operational support. Twe Let is the largest project funded through the migration section of LIFT.

LIFT's Migration Programme was launched in 2016 in recognition of the extensive impact that migration has on rural and urban transformation. Currently, the migration programme provides funding to 15 partners from international and national organizations, the Government of Myanmar, academia and media to jointly make migration safe and a real prospect for development.

For further information, please contact Michiko Ito, IOM Myanmar, Tel: +95 943170624, Email: mito@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 17:40Image: Region-Country: AsiaMyanmarThemes: Labour MigrationMigration and DevelopmentDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

Stranded Guinean Migrants Return to Conakry from Libya

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 10:40
Language English

Libya – On 14 March, IOM assisted 98 stranded Guinean migrants – 96 men and 2 women – to return to Conakry from Libya by air.

The charter flight, which was coordinated with the Libyan and Guinean authorities, departed from Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport. IOM provided pre-departure interviews, medical check-ups and material assistance, including clothes and shoes.

Unfortunately, due to clashes in Tripoli, 51 migrants living in urban areas, who were sheltered by the Guinean-Conakry Embassy for one night prior to the day of departure, were unable to make the flight. These migrants will therefore be assisted to return home via commercial flights as soon as possible. 

“It was a tense day for migrants and colleagues on the ground but with good coordination with the Guinea-Conakry embassy in Libya and the Libyan authority we managed to support 98 out of the planned 149 migrants,” explained Program Manager Ashraf Hassan. “Thanks to the Government of the Netherlands, the rest of the 51 migrants will be supported via commercial flights as soon as possible,” he added.

Among the migrants was also one unaccompanied child.

In addition, on 12 March, IOM worked with Libyan authorities to facilitate the visit of embassy representatives from Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea Conakry, Ghana, Niger and the Gambia to Triq Al Sekka detention centre. During the visit, the delegation representatives discussed possible release conditions of their nationals and observed the living conditions inside the centre.

During the visit IOM identified 135 migrants who expressed willingness to return to their countries of origin and has initiated the return assistance process. The visit was funded by the European Union and the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

The Guinea-Conakry return assistance flight was funded by the Kingdom of the Netherlands and was part of IOM’s return assistance programme.

So far in 2017, IOM Libya has helped 1,261 stranded migrants return to their countries of origin. Of these, 304 were eligible for reintegration assistance.

For further information, please contact IOM Libya’s Othman Belbeisi, Tel: +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Ashraf Hassan, Tel +216 29 794707, Email: ashassan@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 17:36Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastLibyaThemes: Humanitarian EmergenciesDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM

South Sudanese Refugees Trained on Environment Conservation at Jewi Camp, Ethiopia

IOM - News - Ven, 03/17/2017 - 10:36
Language English

Ethiopia - As part of its efforts to support the refugees and host communities in the Gambella Region of Ethiopia, IOM organized a training this week (15/03) for South Sudanese refugees on the impacts of deforestation and the need to replenish vegetation.

As part of the Government of Japan-supported Shelter and Livelihood project for the region, the training was provided to 150 households.

“We registered influential and interested members of the community and, after carrying out a needs assessment, we proceeded with the training. At the end of the course, the refugees are provided with seedlings of trees, including mango, and banana, to help revive and maintain the forestry and local vegetation cover,” said Nhial Dak, a member of IOM’s Livelihood Support team in Gambella.

The Jewi Camp hosts 60,000 South Sudanese refugees and, as it is impossible to monitor all the activities of the refugee population, this awareness-raising is an approach that IOM has taken after making assessments and in consultation with the Ethiopian Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs.

IOM is also working with National Rural Development Program (NRDP) experts and trainings are now planned for Jewi, Kule and Nguenyiel refugee camps.

According to UNHCR figures, with more than 800,000 registered refugees, Ethiopia is the largest refugee-hosting country in Africa.  It is also host to the largest number (over 320,000) of South Sudanese refugees in the world. With such a large refugee population, mostly relying on wood to cook their food, deforestation has become a major concern.

For further information, please contact Miriam Mutalu at IOM Ethiopia, Tel: +251 94 6692 501, Email: mmutalu@iom.int

Posted: Friday, March 17, 2017 - 17:33Image: Region-Country: Africa and Middle EastEthiopiaThemes: Capacity BuildingDefault: 
Categorie: Press Room IOM